Arroyo Beatus

Arroyo Beatus

San Andrés de Arroyo Monastery Codex




Shelf mark: Nouv. acq. lat. 2290.
Date: c. 1220.
Size: 300 x 457 mm.
334 pages, 69 miniatures illuminated with gold and silver leaf.
Beige leather binding.
Leather case.
Full-colour commentary volume (390 p.) by Miguel C. Vivancos (O.S.B.), Dulce Ocón (Universidad del País Vasco), Carmen Bernis (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas) and Carlos Miranda (Doctor en Historia).
Unique and unrepeatable first edition, strictly limited  to 987 numbered and authenticated copies.
ISBN: 978-84-88526-42-7

Arroyo Beatus San Andrés de Arroyo Monastery Codex San Andrés de Arroyo Monastery Codex

Shelf mark: Nouv. acq. lat. 2290.
Date: c. 1220.
Size: 300 x 457 mm.
334 pages, 69 miniatures illuminated with gold and silver leaf.
Beige leather binding.
Leather case.
Full-colour commentary volume (390 p.) by Miguel C. Vivancos (O.S.B.), Dulce Ocón (Universidad del País Vasco), Carmen Bernis (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas) and Carlos Miranda (Doctor en Historia).
Unique and unrepeatable first edition, strictly limited  to 987 numbered and authenticated copies.
ISBN: 978-84-88526-42-7





Commentary volume

Arroyo Beatus San Andrés de Arroyo Monastery Codex


Format: 290 x 380 mm
Pages: 390
Illustrations: 169
Language: Spanish
ISBN: 978-84-88526-41-0

CONTENTS:

Del editor al lector

El Beato de San Andrés de Arroyo
Miguel C. Vivancos (O.S.B.)

Aproximación estilística
Dulce Ocón (Universidad del País Vasco)

Estudio arqueológico de las miniaturas
Carmen Bernis (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas)

Estudio iconográfico
Carlos Miranda (Doctor en Historia)





Description

Arroyo Beatus San Andrés de Arroyo Monastery Codex


The characteristic traits of the Arroyo Beatus make it unique amongst all other beatus codices. It is considered to be a late beatus that combines two features: its images contain high Romanesque formulae and elements reminiscent of the illustrative tradition of early medieval beatus codices, emphasising its ability to enlighten and convey God’s message more effectively than words. In addition, this codex heralds in a return to the visual bases of classicism. The stylistic similarities between the Arroyo Beatus and the Cardeña Beatus suggest that it may have been illustrated in the San Pedro de Cardeña Monastery.

Abundant use was made of gold and silver in the Arroyo Beatus. The Persian lapis lazuli used to obtain the deepest shades of blue endows the manuscript with a lavishness comparable only with the effect produced by gold leaf. All this reveals the desire to produce a rich manuscript, probably commissioned by Saint Ferdinand III. The manuscript was given to the San Andrés de Arroyo Cistercian Monastery where it was safeguarded by the monks in charge until it was acquired from M. Toca in 1882 by the Bibliothèque nationale de France, where it remains to the present day.

Joaquín Yarza,
History of Art Professor



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