Gulbenkian Apocalypse

Museu Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon.




Shelf mark: MS L.A. 139.
Date: England, c. 1265-70.
Size: 270 x 217 mm.
152 pages and 153 illuminations.
Bound in parchment.
Leather case.
Full-colour commentary volume (375 p.) by Emílio Rui Vilar (Chairman of Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian), Nigel Morgan (Honorary Professor of the History of Art, University of Cambridge), Suzanne Lewis (Professor emerita of History of Art at Stanford University), Aires Nascimento (Emeritus professor at the University o Lisbon) and Michelle P. Brown (Professor of Medieval Manuscript Studies at the School of Advanced Study, University of London).
Unique and unrepeatable first edition, strictly limited  to 987 numbered and authenticated copies.
ISBN: 978-84-88526-80-9


Shelf mark: MS L.A. 139.
Date: England, c. 1265-70.
Size: 270 x 217 mm.
152 pages and 153 illuminations.
Bound in parchment.
Leather case.
Full-colour commentary volume (375 p.) by Emílio Rui Vilar (Chairman of Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian), Nigel Morgan (Honorary Professor of the History of Art, University of Cambridge), Suzanne Lewis (Professor emerita of History of Art at Stanford University), Aires Nascimento (Emeritus professor at the University o Lisbon) and Michelle P. Brown (Professor of Medieval Manuscript Studies at the School of Advanced Study, University of London).
Unique and unrepeatable first edition, strictly limited  to 987 numbered and authenticated copies.
ISBN: 978-84-88526-80-9





Commentary volume

Gulbenkian Apocalypse Museu Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon.


Pages: 375
Format: 24 x 33.5 cm
Illustrations: 299
Languages: Spanish and English

Contents:

Preface
Emílio Rui Vilar (Chairman of Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian)

From the editor to the reader

Acknowledgements
Nigel Morgan (Honorary Professor of the History of Art, University of Cambridge)

Introduction
Nigel Morgan

The Illustrated Apocalypse in Thirteenth Century England and its Historical Context
Nigel Morgan

The Apocalypse Illustrations
Nigel Morgan

The commentary illustrations
Suzanne Lewis (Professor emerita of History of Art at Stanford University)

Style, Painting Techniques, date and Place of Production
Nigel Morgan

Codicological and palaeographical Description
Aires Nascimento (Emeritus professor at the University o Lisbon)
Michelle P. Brown (Professor of Medieval Manuscript Studies at the School of Advanced Study, University of London)

Transcription of the Text
Aires Nascimento

Description of Illustrations and Translation of the Text
Nigel Morgan, Suzanne Lewis
Nigel Morgan

Summary Description of Illumination and Text
Bibliography

ISBN: 978-84-88526-79-3
 

 






Description

Gulbenkian Apocalypse Museu Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon.


The truly superb quality and excellent condition of the illuminations in this Apocalypse allow the reader to enjoy its fascinating images in all their glory. The lavish colours and abundant use of burnished gold make the decoration in this codex a marvellous example of late thirteenth-century English illumination.

The miniatures illustrate both the Apocalypse text and the glosses. The images are set inside rectangular frames decorated with a great variety of shapes and colours. The work is characterised by the use of decorated gold, the predominance of blue and reddish-brown hues, and the repeated use of certain filigrees (squares, different geometrical shapes and gold circles surrounded by white dots).

In both the glosses and the Apocalypse, the Antichrist takes different forms: magician, false preacher, sovereign and soldier. Jessie Poesch describes him in a memorable phrase as "a strange, diabolic and chameleonic figure" whose sinister presence permeates all spheres of human activity.

Although it is not certain, this codex probably belonged to Pope Clement IX (1667-1669). The manuscript was acquired in the latter half of the 19th century by Cesare Battaglini de Rimini thanks to his wife, a descendant of Clement IX. It belonged to Henry Yates Thomson from 1899 to 1920, when it was bought by Calouste Gulbenkian. It is currently part of the Gulbenkian Foundation Museum collection in Lisbon.



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