Mattioli’s Dioscorides illustrated by Cibo (Discorsi by Mattioli and Cibo)

The British Library, London




The extraordinary miniatures that illustrate this breathtaking manuscript are by the brilliant artist and botanist Gherardo Cibo (1512-1600), the great-grandson of Pope Innocent VIII.

The text is that of Discorsi by Pietro Andrea Mattioli (1501-1577) who, besides being an eminent naturalist, was also the personal physician of Ferdinand II, Archduke of Austria, and of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor.

Discorsi consists of commentaries on Dioscorides’ famous De Materia Medica with the addition of many other plant species – including some recently discovered in America, the East and the Tyrol that were barely known at that time – chosen for their singularity or beauty, unlike those in Dioscorides’ treatise. Discorsi proved to be a forerunner of modern botany and was remarkably successful in its day.

These are the most beautiful illustrations that Cibo ever painted for Mattioli’s writings, as revealed by an extant letter in which Mattioli himself heartily congratulates Cibo for his work.
This book is a must for lovers of medicine and botany and painting in general on account of the painstaking detail and colour used in the illustrations of the different species and the lively background scenes which usually depict the natural habitat of the respective species. 

Unique and unrepeatable first edition, strictly limited to 987 numbered and authenticated copies.
Helleboris viridis or Elleboro nero (Green hellibore) in Mattioli`s Dioscorides illustrated by Cibo, Add. Ms. 22332.

The extraordinary miniatures that illustrate this breathtaking manuscript are by the brilliant artist and botanist Gherardo Cibo (1512-1600), the great-grandson of Pope Innocent VIII.

The text is that of Discorsi by Pietro Andrea Mattioli (1501-1577) who, besides being an eminent naturalist, was also the personal physician of Ferdinand II, Archduke of Austria, and of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor.

Discorsi consists of commentaries on Dioscorides’ famous De Materia Medica with the addition of many other plant species – including some recently discovered in America, the East and the Tyrol that were barely known at that time – chosen for their singularity or beauty, unlike those in Dioscorides’ treatise. Discorsi proved to be a forerunner of modern botany and was remarkably successful in its day.

These are the most beautiful illustrations that Cibo ever painted for Mattioli’s writings, as revealed by an extant letter in which Mattioli himself heartily congratulates Cibo for his work.
This book is a must for lovers of medicine and botany and painting in general on account of the painstaking detail and colour used in the illustrations of the different species and the lively background scenes which usually depict the natural habitat of the respective species. 

Unique and unrepeatable first edition, strictly limited to 987 numbered and authenticated copies.



Description

Mattioli’s Dioscorides illustrated by Cibo (Discorsi by Mattioli and Cibo) The British Library, London


✵ Shelf mark: Add. Ms. 22332
✵ Date: c. 1564-1584
✵ Size: 265 x 195 mm
✵ Pages: 370 pages, 131 full-page miniatures
✵ Bound in gold-tooled and stamped black leather
✵ Full-colour commentary volume

Unique and unrepeatable first edition, strictly limited to 987 numbered and authenticated copies.


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